Review: On the Run From the Nazis in the Arctic in ‘The 12th Man’

Photo

Thomas Gullestad as Jan Baalsrud in “The 12th Man.” Credit IFC Midnight

“The 12th Man” depicts a Norwegian hero’s resistance to Nazism during World War II, centering on the true story of Jan Baalsrud (Thomas Gullestad), a rebel fighter who evaded capture for over two months during the German occupation of Norway.

The film begins when 11 of Jan’s comrades are taken prisoner by Nazi soldiers. One is killed immediately, while the other 10 endure torture first on their way to death, a fate that surely awaits Jan if he fails to reach neutral Sweden. He starts his flight on foot, limping from the initial skirmish after losing a toe to a stray bullet. As Jan slowly makes his way to the border, he is pursued relentlessly by a high-ranking Nazi officer, Kurt Stage (Jonathan Rhys Meyers), even as frostbite and gangrene force Jan to rely ever more on the protection of friendly Norwegians. In “The 12th Man,” escape is a matter of endurance.

Video

Trailer: ‘The 12th Man’

A preview of the film.

By IFC MIDNIGHT on Publish Date April 24, 2018. .

In his direction of Jan’s exodus, Harald Zwart lingers on the Arctic Circle location of this hero’s ordeal. The mountainous borderlands bring the threat of extremities lost to cold, the challenge of crossing streams when the touch of water might chill you for days. Sleds and sleighs become vehicles of guerrilla warfare; reindeer are fashioned into allies; daring escapes are made on skis. The reward of Mr. Zwart’s attention to the unique details of this historical account is that Jan’s path to safety frequently shocks, offering scenes of defiance that are unfamiliar or unexpected. In a familiar genre, “The 12th Man” preserves the element of surprise by understanding its terrain.

Continue reading the main story

Хостинг сайтов Joinder.Pro

Opinion: Donald Trump’s Racism: The Definitive List

Donald Trump has been obsessed with race for the entire time he has been a public figure. He had a history of making racist comments as a New York real-estate developer in the 1970s and ‘80s. More recently, his political rise was built on promulgating the lie that the nation’s first black president was born in Kenya. He then launched his campaign with a speech describing Mexicans as rapists.

The media often falls back on euphemisms when describing Trump’s comments about race: racially loaded, racially charged, racially tinged, racially sensitive. And Trump himself has claimed that he is “the least racist person.” But here’s the truth: Donald Trump is a racist. He talks about and treats people differently based on their race. He has done so for years, and he is still doing so.

Here, we have attempted to compile a definitive list of his racist comments – or at least the publicly known ones.

In 1989, on NBC, Trump said: “I think sometimes a black may think they don’t have an advantage or this and that. I’ve said on one occasion, even about myself, if I were starting off today, I would love to be a well-educated black, because I really believe they do have an actual advantage.”

Хостинг сайтов Joinder.Pro

Both Climate Leader and Oil Giant? A Norwegian Paradox

While Norway wants to wean its own citizens off fossil fuels, it remains one of the world’s biggest petroleum producers and is revving up exports.

Хостинг сайтов Joinder.Pro