New York Times Metro Editor Resigns, Citing ‘Mistakes’

Wendell Jamieson, who had led The New York Times’s metro section for five years, issued an apology before leaving the paper. But the reason for his departure was not disclosed.

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David Zwirner on Helping Young Galleries

By THE NEW YORK TIMES | Apr. 26, 2018 | 0:48

David Zwirner, Art Dealer and Owner of David Zwirner Gallery, suggests how larger, established galleries could try supporting younger galleries at The New York Times Art Leaders Network conference in Berlin.

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A Comeback for Chinese Contemporary Art?

By THE NEW YORK TIMES | Apr. 26, 2018 | 1:02

Lisa Dennison, Sotheby’s Americas Chairman, talks about the taste for Western art in Asian markets and the possible comeback of Chinese contemporary art at The New York Times Art Leaders Network conference in Berlin.

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Dr. Uli Sigg on China’s Art Market

By THE NEW YORK TIMES | Apr. 26, 2018 | 0:46

Dr. Uli Sigg, Former Swiss Ambassador to China, North Korea and Mongolia, and Deputy Chairman of the Ringier Group, talks about the tendencies of Chinese buyers at The New York Times Art Leaders Network conference in Berlin.

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The Times’s Reporting on Harvey Weinstein Will Get Movie Treatment

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Megan Twohey, left, and Jodi Kantor, who revealed decades of sexual misconduct by Harvey Weinstein, will be the subjects of a film. Credit Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times

Two prominent Hollywood production companies have acquired the rights to produce a film based on The New York Times’s coverage of sexual misconduct by Harvey Weinstein, The Times confirmed on Thursday.

The movie will follow the work of Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters at The Times, and their editor, Rebecca Corbett. The team’s reporting on Mr. Weinstein helped set off the #MeToo movement and earn The Times a Pulitzer Prize for public service.

The rights were bought by Plan B, a production company co-founded by Brad Pitt that produced “12 Years a Slave” and “Moonlight,” and Annapurna Pictures, founded by Megan Ellison, the company behind “Zero Dark Thirty” and “Phantom Thread.”

In October, an article by Ms. Kantor and Ms. Twohey revealed decades of sexual harassment allegations against Mr. Weinstein, one of the most powerful executives in Hollywood. That article, along with reporting by Ronan Farrow of The New Yorker, led to a global movement that would expose sexual misconduct by prominent men in numerous industries, as well as the everyday sexism and abuse experienced by millions of women.

After the news broke, Mr. Weinstein told The Hollywood Reporter, “The story sounds so good, I want to buy the movie rights.” He was soon fired from the movie company he co-founded.

Subsequent Times articles revealed many more victims of Mr. Weinstein’s harassment, including the actresses Angelina Jolie and Gwyneth Paltrow. By the end of October, the list of known allegations stretched back to the 1970s, and Mr. Weinstein had been fired from his company. The Times later documented how Mr. Weinstein’s abuses went unchecked for decades with help from his associates.

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Amy Cappellazzo on A Bidder’s Big Moment

By THE NEW YORK TIMES | Apr. 26, 2018 | 0:35

Amy Cappellazzo, Executive Vice President and Chairman of the Sotheby’s Global Fine Arts Division, talks to Robin Pogrebin at The New York Times Art Leaders Network conference about what it’s like for a bidder who is about to make a major purchase over the phone.

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